7.09.2015

Decarli Restaurant and Catalyst Wedge

These are 3 out of 5 paintings that will be on display 
at Decarli Restaurant from July 8 - September 8, 2015. 
 Ominous
48" x 36" x 1.5
oil on canvas
$1200
Click here to purchase
Grasslands
48" x 36" x 1.5
oil on canvas
$1200
Click here to purchase
Coastline
48" x 36" x 1.5
oil on canvas
$1200
Click here to purchase
Here is my husband, Lad, hanging them!
Process: right now I am using a Catalyst Wedge in my work. 
I took a close up of this photo of Coastline so that you might see it closer.
Catalyst Wedge  
I like the wedge because it allows me to move color 
and drag it around and extend a simple movement or direction. 
Does this make sense?
I have tried an old credit card, palette knives, matte board, 
card board, etc., but I like the Catalyst Wedge best.
I am anxious to try the squeeguee like artist Charlie Hunter.

Do you have anything that you prefer or that 
I might have missed? :)

 Listening to while I paint:
Audiobook:  
How to Win Friends and Influence People
Podcasts: 
Beyond the To-Do List, hosted by Erik Fischer
The Nerdist, John Cusack, hosted by Chris Hardwick
Artists Helping Artists, hosted by Leslie Saeta
The Chalene Show, hosted by Chalene Johnson
Social Media Examiner, hosted by Michael Stelzner
"Wait, Wait.... Don't Tell Me!", hosted by Peter Sagal
Splendid Table, hosted by Lynne Rossetto Kasper
American's Test Kitchen, hosted by Christopher Kimball
Truth For Life, hosted by Alistair Begg

Music: 
My iPod


Really helpful!:
I am continually checking a dictionary, thesaurus, spell check, but one thing that has been particularly helpful is the grammar check. Please excuse any errors that I make and tell me! :)


5.13.2015

Randall Tipton Demo Using Yupo Paper!


Donna Sanson and I had the privilege to see Randall Tipton demonstrate at Museum 510 in Lake Oswego, Oregon. 
He is a very accomplished and wonderful painter, and he is one of my favorite art friends!
He was demonstrating  with watercolor painting on Yupo paper. "Yupo is a compelling and unique alternative to traditional art papers. It's a synthetic paper, machine-made in the USA of 100% polypropylene. It is waterproof, stain-resistant, and extremely strong and durable." 
From Blick Art Materials

He says:
       "It's plastic, nothing is absorbed! The water in the paint must evaporate. This [use of Yupo] requires a completely different approach. A major difficulty is getting the paint to stay 'still'. I can do something I like, turn away, and when I return, it's different! It's as if the paint has its own agenda. This can be a strength as well. Watercolor can do marvelous things on this brilliant white surface. What would be muddy on true paper becomes rich, subtle, and sometimes profound".
It was a pleasure watching him paint. He uses a big, soft brush down to smaller one....well, I let him describe all the tools he uses: 
          "A natural sponge for pre-wetting and later lifting. Lots of Kleenex for blotting, Q-tips for drawing through wet paint making a soft fat line, a silicone spatula for drawing with a sharper line, a piece of mat board with a bevel edge for scraping like with a squeegee, cheap house painter brush for blending and then the watercolor brushes. Note those at the top have extra long soft bristles. I`ve come to prefer this type because you can really load them up yet they`ll also come to an edge or point. I`m using a bristle filbert that is extra long for oil painting too. Then there is the angle brush up above. I love these because they double as a wash brush but also can be used for line.
On bigger paintings I`ll use a much larger assortment. Often I`ll stop in my process and look over the choices to choose the best one for the task at hand. I feel like a surgeon sometimes"!
Randall started a magnolia painting. He says,"I try to get something I like...something to encourage me".
He left the demo with this......
Magnolia and Sky with watermedia and oils 20 x 20
.....and finished it at home. Because he started it with watercolor, he sealed it with spray acrylic. He then added acrylics and finally oils. Above is the final piece. It's beautiful.
There were several of his works at Museum 510, these are the few I took photos of....
"Randall thinks of himself as a realist who paints personal subject matter. 'I'm a nature boy'. His loyalty is to the process. Randall begins with an idea. He's not a slave to an image and paints mostly from memory. 'I look at the image in my head'. While painting, 'I keep the thing in play, in process. I might focus on the tangle in the front with the distant meadow as a quiet moment. Being in nature and/or thinking of nature is something I do 24/7. That's why I live in Oregon' ".  From Sarah Peroutka notes.
I look forward to his blog because it is so well written, honest, and full of the most interesting and fun things. (check out the new cat carrier!

Listening to while I paint:
Podcasts: 
Beyond the To-Do List, hosted by Erik Fischer
The Nerdist, hosted by Chris Hardwick
Artists Helping Artists, hosted by Leslie Saeta
The Chalene Show, hosted by Chalene Johnson
Social Media Examiner, hosted by Michael Stelzner
"Wait, Wait.... Don't Tell Me!", hosted by Peter Sagal
Splendid Table, hosted by Lynne Rossetto Kasper
American's Test Kitchen, hosted by Christopher Kimball
Truth For Life, hosted by Alistair Begg

Music: 
My iPod


Really helpful!:
I am continually checking a dictionary, thesaurus, spell check, but one thing that has been particularly helpful is the grammar check. Please excuse any errors that I make and tell me! :)


4.22.2015

Curiosity


Curiosity 
18"x 24"x 1.5"
oil on panel
$625
Click here to purchase

I can't wait to take pictures at the summer farmers' market. 
(The Beaverton Farmers Market starts Saturday, May 2.) 
I take pictures of people sitting on benches relaxing or eating, standing in line waiting for the food vendors, playing with their children, etc..  
I don't have a plan in mind (maybe I should?), so I take lots of random photos and then I look at them on Photoshop to see what I have captured. 
I took this photo a few years ago. I love the little girl's posture and the way she is looking curiously at.....? 
I wanted the attention on *her* in the painting. Coming from a illustration and a bio-medical illustration background it was hard for me to vary the edges and distort the background. That pink shirt in the middle? It was just too much!  I had to add a little blue and a pink drip down her leg..... 
Here's is a close-up.

I found a new tool I used, the gray Catalyst Wedge . It has a flexibility that I like and I can drag my paint across with a big sweeping motion! :) (not really)

This is another one at the farmers' market: people standing in lines, talking to each other, but not this boy. He is just so curious about his shadow...
Shadow
8"x 10"
acrylic on gessoboard 
$195
Click here to purchase


Listening to while I paint:
Podcasts: 
Beyond the To-Do List, hosted by Erik Fischer
The Nerdist, hosted by Chris Hardwick
Artists Helping Artists, hosted by Leslie Saeta
The Chalene Show, hosted by Chalene Johnson
Social Media Examiner, hosted by Michael Stelzner
"Wait, Wait.... Don't Tell Me!", hosted by Peter Sagal
Splendid Table, hosted by Lynne Rossetto Kasper
American's Test Kitchen, hosted by Christopher Kimball
Truth For Life, hosted by Alistair Begg

Music: 
My iPod


Really helpful!:
I am continually checking a dictionary, thesaurus, spell check, but one thing that has been particularly helpful is the grammar check. Please excuse any errors that I make and tell me! :)

4.05.2015

Daisy, Studio Tip, Stroke Update


Daisy, Green Vase
6"x 6", Framed
oil on gessoboard

Studio Tip:
I like to paint on panels and boards, and my friend, Doug, built a storage system to hold them. 
Now.... I needed to come up with a way to hold/support them on my easel. 
There is a "lip" that covers up the upper and lower part of your panel.
I tried to sit the panel on the "lip"and it didn't work. It wasn't secure. (it fell down......scary!!!)
So, in my efforts to come up with a remedy, I have found some solutions:
David Darrow  -"My board is 2ft x 2ft x 1/2” birch plywood. I bought a flat, aluminum “bar” at a hardware store, cut too 12” pieces from it, and drilled holes through them both. I set a panel onto it, then somewhere along the top edge I stab a screw into the board very close to the painting. Sometimes the threads hold it in place, other times, the wide head of the screw. 
I have been using this board for 15 years, so far."
Scott Conary -"On my small easel, I've added some bits of wood so that 1/4" panel has something to brace against."

David and Scott made these supports/braces and are master woodworkers! 

Now, I could do Michael Orwick's approach:
He screwed 4 screws; .2 at the top and 2 at the bottom of his easel to support the panel.

Or..... I can just buy one...
Carol Marine - "designed by David Marine - holds the panel still and allows you to paint off every edge with nothing in the way." Carol Marine's Easel


Karin Jurick  the "Paint On" easel comes in two forms: one that fits on your stand-up easel and one that is a tabletop easel. 

 Any other suggestions???

Stroke Up-date:
This is kinda funny....
 This is where I lift almost every day...... pretty intense and intimidating, right?
But the one thing that I had to overcome this huge hill  because I have this thing called "foot drop".
"Foot drop is a gait abnormality in which the dropping of the forefoot happens due to weakness, irritation or damage...." Wikipedia
I couldn't climb up or down that thing without some help from a nearby weight machine....
Curbs were another problem. I had to use the car or a person, (all of which were happy to help!) to get up and down those.

But I conquered it!!!!

Listening to while I paint:
Audio Books:
"David and Goliath" by Malcolm Gladwell

Podcasts: 
The Nerdist, hosted by Chris Hardwick
Here's The Thing, hosted by Alec Baldwin
Artists Helping Artists, hosted by Leslie Saeta
Social Media Examiner, hosted by Michael Stelzner
"Wait, Wait.... Don't Tell Me!", hosted by Peter Sagal
Splendid Table, hosted by Lynne Rossetto Kasper
American's Test Kitchen, hosted by Christopher Kimball
Truth For Life, hosted by Alistair Begg

Music: 
My iPod


Really helpful!:
I am continually checking a dictionary, thesaurus, spell check, but one thing that has been particularly helpful is the grammar check. Please excuse any errors that I make and tell me! :)











2.07.2015

"Bane"


Bane
11"x 14"
oil
NFS


A client asked me to do this portrait for her son and daughter-in-law for Christmas. I had the son tell me about Bane:

"We spontaneously bought him the day we mentioned the idea of getting a puppy. I spent the entire day at work calling breeders. We drove to Sheridan to see the last boy of a litter - he was the only one lazily sleeping in the back of the pen. We brought him back to our apartment which he quickly outgrew. We moved into a house so he could have a yard. My mom - a known animal hater - even fell in love with his kind gentle demeanor. He fit right in with our family because he is abnormally large for his breed - a gentle giant (our family is full of large people). We love him very much - he is our "practice baby" - and all the vets bills, early morning potty breaks, and chewed up clothes, are worth dealing with to come home at the end of the day to someone who loves you more than anything in the world. He is pretty much our main source of joy on a daily basis. It's fun watching him grow, play and learn! -he's the smartest boy. Bane won't live much longer than a decade - but Annie's painting will be with us forever. She truly captured his personality in a frame. 
Thanks for making our Christmas."


That is one thing I enjoy about my drawing or painting - the chance to make something that will be special, significant, important to whomever for years to come!

Listening to while I paint:
Audio Books:
"Love Does" by Bob Goff

Podcasts: 
Food is the New Rock, hosted by Zach Brooks
The Lede, hosted by Jerod Morris
Artists Helping Artists, hosted by Leslie Saeta
Social Media Examiner, hosted by Michael Stelzner
"Wait, Wait.... Don't Tell Me!", hosted by Peter Sagal
Splendid Table, hosted by Lynne Rossetto Kasper
American's Test Kitchen, hosted by Christopher Kimball

Music: 
My iPod

Really helpful!:
I am continually checking a dictionary, thesaurus, spell check, but one thing that has been particularly helpful is the grammar check. Please excuse any errors that I make and tell me! :)




1.23.2015

Football and Art? :)

My husband called me to watch a play in a football game on TV. "I want you to see this....it is the perfect tipping drill!" he said. 
It was!  
I appreciated it because I coached football with him for about 6 years. We coached the freshmen. 

The University High School Trojans football, Irvine, CA. 1986?
I am the short girl in the white shirt. :)

I would coach the corner-backs and I remember all the drills I had them do..... .doing the same thing over and over again. Why? So when you get in a game, you don't have to think about how to shift your weight, the correct tackling form, the "tipping drill" etc....you just react to the game. Prepare ahead and practice the skill until muscle memory kicks in. 

One of the good parts of me having my stroke was that I have to draw all the time to switch to my left hand, (my right hand is still not responsive yet.) doing the same thing over and over..... 
Something I should have been doing anyway!
 I always start with drawing lines to an upbeat song like this:


and then I settle down and I draw whatever is around me or go to an online figure drawing site and listen to this:

and this:


I KNOW that if I don't DRAW, PAINT, or WORKOUT everyday, I would not improve. 
At times, my recovery seems like it is taking forever,  (4 years, 3 months, 2 weeks, 2 days...), but I see improvement! 
Practice, practice, practice. Improve, improve, improve. 
Never give up!

Listening to while I paint:
Audio Books:
"Creativity, Inc." by Ed Catmull, narrated by Peter Altschuler.

Podcasts: 
The Nerdist, Episode 621, with Andrea Romano (voice director), hosted by Chris                                              Hardwick
Food is the New Rock, hosted by Zach Brooks
The Lede, hosted by Jerod Morris
Artists Helping Artists, hosted by Leslie Saeta
Social Media Examiner, hosted by Michael Stelzner
"Wait, Wait.... Don't Tell Me!", hosted by Peter Sagal
Splendid Table, hosted by Lynne Rossetto Kasper
American's Test Kitchen, hosted by Christopher Kimball

Music: 
My iPod

Really helpful!:
I am continually checking a dictionary, thesaurus, spell check, but one thing that has been particularly helpful is the grammar check. Please excuse any errors that I make and tell me! :)


12.19.2014

Happy Holidays, Amy Melious and Cookie Sheets!

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!
Candy Cane
8"x 10"
oil on gessoboard
$195
Click here to purchase

I had my very talented cousin, Amy Melious, over for a visit. She is a photographic artist. (and very pretty!)
We were cooking and baking and I was trying to hide these ugly cookie sheets when she said not to hide them, got out her camera and took photos of them! 
She takes pictures of the textures to use in her photography. I really don't understand what she does, so here is her explanation:
"Annie, the first very (fabulously) rustic cookie pan is yours, followed by the two long landscape images I tested it on."
 The original....
...one with texture.
"Isn’t it great that we can make art and cookies from the very same pans? It's one instance when we get to have our cake and eat it too!
My love of photographing textures started more than a decade ago as I was ending a ten year love affair with the Polaroid transfer process in favor of expanding my horizons into digital techniques.
I was interested in the new capabilities that digital world offered, but wasn’t ready to give up the very nostalgic, personal, and imperfect qualities of the Polaroid transfer look. 
So, I tried to figure out how to apply that “look”in Photoshop, almost like you would antique a piece of furniture.  I started going around looking for textures in my immediate environment, experimenting with each of them composited over my photographs. My skills at the time were limited, but it didn’t take long to find out what worked best, and it was so much fun!
Now, I have a huge collection of textures from all over the world – among them a few faves that I use often.
I know that in recent years, several companies have appeared that sell textures. They’re also built into some apps  and are sold as plug-ins for image editing software. They can be quick and fun and so have a place for sure. However, I always encourage people to photograph their own  as well in order to give their pictures more personal meaning and uniqueness.
Texture layers is easy to use if you have basic knowledge of Photoshop. You simply open the image and the texture, then drag the texture onto the image and drop. Photoshop will automatically put the texture in it’s own new layer. Then, the really fun part is to scroll through the blend modes in the layers palette until you see a version you like. Remember that you can reduce the opacity of the layer to minimize it’s effect to any degree you want. Also, you can mask the layer and hide the effect from any area of the image (using the paintbrush tool).

And to go along with the cookie sheets, here’s my family’s very favorite holiday cookie recipe:

Molasses Spice Cookies: From “The Best Recipe” book by Cooks Illustrated.
 2 1/4 c flour
2 teasp baking soda
1/2 teasp salt
1 1/2 teasp cinnamon
1 teasp ground ginger
3/4 teasp ground cloves
1/4 teasp ground allspice
12 Tb unsalted butter (1 1/2 sticks), softened.
1/2 c dark brown sugar
1/2  white sugar, plus 1/2 cup aside for rolling balls before baking
1 large egg
1 teasp vanilla
1/3 c unsulphured molasses
 Heat oven to 375
 Mix flour, b. soda, salt and spices together.
In a separate bowl, combine butter, brown sugar, white sugar- mix until fluffy, then add egg, vanilla and molasses, mix just until blended.
Add the dry ingredients, mix just until combined.
 Make 2 Tb dough at a time into 1 3/4 inch balls. Roll the balls in white sugar and place on ungreased cookie sheets, about 2 inches apart.
 Bake 11-13 minutes. They should crack on top.  Cool on racks.

Best wishes to you and your readers for a happy season!
xo
Amy "

I now look for textures in everything!

She was recently published in Somerset Digital Studio, and plan ahead and take her workshop in Spain:
One day at a time, tucked away among olive groves, far
from all distraction, Gail Short and Amy Melious will
unfold the wonderful world of creative process." Read more...  Flavor of Spain

Thank you Amy!

Listening to while I paint:
Audio Books:
"A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens, narrated by Jim Dale.

Podcasts:
Food is the New Rock, hosted by Zach Brooks
The Lede, hosted by Jerod Morris
Artists Helping Artists, hosted by Leslie Saeta
Social Media Examiner, hosted by Michael Stelzner
"Wait, Wait.... Don't Tell Me!", hosted by Peter Sagal
Splendid Table, hosted by Lynne Rossetto Kasper
American's Test Kitchen, hosted by Christopher Kimball

Music:
My iPod: Christmas music!

Really helpful!:
I am continually checking a dictionary, thesaurus, spell check, but one thing that has been particularly helpful is the grammar check. Please excuse any errors that I make and tell me! :)

11.23.2014

Happy Thanksgiving! and Scott Conary's Studio


Pumpkin
8"x 8"
oil on gessoboard
Click here to purchase

My husband and I went to the Sitka Art Invitational, and I was stuck by Scott Conary's work, especially by his painting, "Robert's Door".
The use of color and the paint application was stunning!
 
Roberts Door
32"x 54"
oil on canvas
Clearly, the colors, paint application, and its majesty does not show up in this photo. 
That is why it is so important to see the art work in person! 
"As my eyes came upon the worn door on the heavy old house, I saw the painting in my head. I saw generations of hands turning a now missing knob and" read more by Scott.... 

 Scott lives near my friend Mona Cordell, so she and I and my new friend, Mary Parkes, got to go by his studio.
What a kind, gracious man.
He said that he cleaned up!

He makes his own frames or orders then from Franken Frames.
Prime
26"x 38"
oil on canvas
Meat!  Isn't it beautiful? Read more about meat here.

1928 Indian 4, 52" x 42", 
Oil on Canvas
-work in progress-
"A few months back, a friend gave me a tour of some old machines in Wichita. Amongst them was this amazing bike, restored by a friend of his. The painting is very much a work in progress, but the bones are there." -Scott
Ornament
7 1/2"x 6 3/4"
oil on panel
This painting inspired my "Pumpkin" painting. 

Take some time and really look at his work and read his stories. His blog is a great place to learn about his past and present struggles and how he, his wife and his daughter, continue to deal with these challenges. 
He can write and paint beautifully.


I have paintings for sale for your holiday gifts, most for under $200. 
Click here to purchase.
Or buy prints here.

Listening to while I paint:
Audio Books:
"A Painted House" by John Grisham, narrated by David Lansbury

Podcasts: 
Food is the New Rock, hosted by Zach Brooks
The Lede, hosted by Jerod Morris
Artists Helping Artists, hosted by Leslie Saeta
Social Media Examiner, hosted by Michael Stelzner
"Wait, Wait.... Don't Tell Me!", hosted by Peter Sagal
Splendid Table, hosted by Lynne Rossetto Kasper
American's Test Kitchen, hosted by Christopher Kimball

Music:
My iPod: Christmas music!

Really helpful!:
I am continually checking a dictionary, thesaurus, spell check, but one thing that has been particularly helpful is the grammar check! Please excuse any errors that I make and tell me! :)



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